Rise and Shine

FullSizeRender (8)We have all seen how much Jeep sleeps during the day at school.  (We don’t call her Sleepy Jeepie for nothing!) Apparently, Jeep isn’t the only hard to wake up Pyrenees out there. Check out this video of a pyr who works on a farm watching over goats – well, he is supposed to be watching them.  Looks to me that he is asleep on the job.

If only pyrs weren’t so set on being nocturnal.  Jeep is usually wide awake in the wee hours of the morning and would love nothing better than to get me up to play outside with her.  Fat chance fluff ball!

https://www.facebook.com/justvideotvi/videos/759750350875018/UzpfSTIyMDc5OTYzMTU6MTAxNTU1MjcyOTQzNDYzMTY/

Jeep is All Smiles at the Dentist

Jeep visited the dentist today with my husband just to remind all her kid friends that a visit to the dentist’s office isn’t scary.  In fact, Jeep enjoyed meeting the whole crew at Smiles by Design in Richmond – just check out her smile!

Jeep and my husband were welcomed by an amiable receptionist named Barb who asked all kinds of questions before the actual teeth cleaning.  Barb escorted Jeep and my husband into a special room with a big, comfortable chair and special lights.  Jeep watched on as Kathy, a skilled dental hygenist, busily cleaned and polished my husband’s teeth.  When Kathy was finished our friendly dentist, Dr. Jim Reichle, examined all of his teeth to be sure there were no cavities or problems.  Everyone was very kind and attentive!

Did you know that both dogs and people have two sets of teeth during their lives? A dog’s first set has 28 baby teeth and its adult set has 42 teeth. That is a third more than people have!  We only have 20 baby teeth and 32 adult teeth.  Both dogs and people can experience tooth decay and gum disease. Just like people, if a dog loses an adult tooth it won’t regrow.   That is why it is so important to take care of both your teeth and your fuzzy friend’s teeth.  For tips on how to clean your own dog’s teeth check out:

10 Ways to Clean your Dog’s Teeth

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Fireworks and Furballs

july-4-dogDid you know that more dogs go missing over the 4th of July than at any other time of the year?  The reason? They get spooked and panic over the fireworks.  Please be sure that your pets are safe inside when the fireworks begin.  

Luckily, Jeep doesn’t seem to mind fireworks.  I think it is because she has gotten used to all kinds of noises at school including loud fire drills and all-school assemblies. It takes a lot to rile up Jeep unless of course there happens to be a howling coyote in the area.

Dot Com, on the other hand, will hide in a closet until the night sky is quiet again.  Poor Dottie!  Hopefully, Jeep will keep her company. Afterall, that’s what friends are for!

The Return of Mrs. Splashypants

 

 

A lot of Jeep’s friends wonder how Jeep keeps cool in the summer, especially since she is so fond of cold weather.  Every day we fill Jeep’s kiddie pool up with fresh cold water and she jumps right in.  We have never seen her actually sit down or lie down in the pool like Dot Com does, but Jeep enjoys it all the same.  Check out these slow-motion videos of Jeep in action!

First Day of Summer School

IMG_2885Although today’s weather certainly did not feel much like summer, Jeep was on hand to welcome all of her kid friends to the start of summer school.  This year summer school is being held at Hooper Elementary.  Jeep is looking forward to spending time in all the classrooms.  I think she likes having kids from all four schools at Hooper!IMG_2874

Field Day Fun

IMG_2850Jeep had a terrific time watching all the Field Day activities at her schools.  She especially liked the water sports.  I have to say, she was a bit disappointed to find out that the kiddie pools actually held plastic balls instead of water.  (Too bad Dot Com wasn’t around – she would have LOVED all the balls!)

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Join Jeep at Culver’s on Tuesday!

culvers-guyThat’s right!  Our friend Jeep will be at Culver’s in Grayslake on Route 83 at 5 p.m. sharp tomorrow night to show her support for our PTO’s Dining for Dollars event.  This is our last Dining for Dollars night, so be sure to get   your family there.

We all know what a picky eater Jeep is, so I am wondering what she will like more, a plain Butterburger with cheddar OR a vanilla custard cone? They both sound yummy to me!  I’m sure Jeep will want to bring something home for her friend Dot Com, too.  After all,    that is what friends are for!

Hope to see all Jeep’s friends at Culver’s!

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Getting “Tick”ed Off

downloadIt is tick season again! If your furry friends spend lots of time outdoors like Jeep and Dot Com, you need to be on the lookout for ticks.  Ticks can be black, brown or tan.  They have eight legs because they are arachnids, just like spiders.  Some ticks such as deer ticks can be very tiny.  Pay attention when you are petting your dog or cat.  A tick will feel like a small bump on their skin.  These tiny bloodsuckers can make dogs (and cats) sick.  As ticks feed on your pet, they swell up with blood and become larger. This makes them easier to spot.  You can pull them off with a tweezers or tick puller, but be sure to get the whole body and not leave pieces behind in their skin.  That could cause an infection.

Here is a great video about how to remove a tick should your furry friend get one.  Oh, don’t forget, people can get bitten by ticks, too!  I know – YUCK!!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ys_aEqm3iQ0

Be sure to talk to your vet about tick prevention.  Every three months Jeep and Dottie are given a special pill to swallow.  (Jeep HATES swallowing pills even when they are hidden in steak, cat food or peanut butter. I have even tried sprinkling yummy beef liver treats on the pill and she still won’t eat it. Picky Pyrenees! )  The good news is that these pills keep our girls safe throughout the year.

You may recall that last year our friend, Jeep, contracted Lyme’s Disease from a tick.  Jeep became even more sleepy than usual and had trouble standing up.  Poor Jeep! Lucky for us, our vet had her blood tested right away and placed her on medication for two weeks – yes, that meant more pill swallowing fun.  Now she gets her tick pill every three months even though it’s still quite an ordeal to get it down her.

I have been told that a person can get a dog to swallow a pill simply by placing a pill in the back of the dog’s mouth, holding the mouth shut and blowing in their nose.  For some reason it causes them to swallow right away.  I think I will try it next time IF I can get my hands around Jeep’s big mouth!IMG_2705